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  Message 1 of 6  
09 Apr 18 09:55
R0b0t1
xxxxxx@gmail.com
Join Date: 24 Mar 2017
Posts To This List: 85
Mobile Drivers

Hello friends, I have looked through the documentation a bit more, and I am having trouble figuring out how to proceed with Windows Phone driver development. In the WDK, I can see options for building for ARM, and for building UEFI applications. However, approaching development is still rather opaque. Are kernel facilities the same? In this case, please assume that the not-consumer-controlled Secure Boot of these platforms is not an issue. Cheers, R0b0t1 --
  Message 2 of 6  
09 Apr 18 10:50
Doron Holan
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Join Date: 08 Sep 2005
Posts To This List: 10195
Mobile Drivers

You want to write a universal driver https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/drivers/develop/getting-started -with-universal-drivers d Bent from my phone ________________________________ From: xxxxx@lists.osr.com <xxxxx@lists.osr.com> on behalf of xxxxx@gmail.com <xxxxx@lists.osr.com> Sent: Monday, April 9, 2018 6:55:34 AM To: Windows System Software Devs Interest List Subject: [ntdev] Mobile Drivers Hello friends, I have looked through the documentation a bit more, and I am having trouble figuring out how to proceed with Windows Phone driver development. In the WDK, I can see options for building for ARM, and for building UEFI applications. However, approaching development is still rather opaque. Are kernel facilities the same? In this case, please assume that the not-consumer-controlled Secure Boot of these platforms is not an issue. Cheers, R0b0t1 --- NTDEV is sponsored by OSR Visit the list online at: MONTHLY seminars on crash dump analysis, WDF, Windows internals and software drivers! Details at To unsubscribe, visit the List Server section of OSR Online at --
  Message 3 of 6  
09 Apr 18 14:41
Peter Viscarola (OSR)
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List Moderator
Mobile Drivers

<quote> how to proceed with Windows Phone driver development </quote> Now... THERE's a topic I haven't had anyone ask me in, oh, two or three years at least... :-) <quote> Are kernel facilities the same? </quote> Yes. What Doron said: Write a Universal Driver. The rest of it... it's Windows. Now... having SAID that... if you're REALLY writing driver(s) for phone, there are lots of very interesting power management issues, if you want to wring the last bits of efficiency out of those batteries. Always On/Always Connected... AKA Connected Standby/Modern Standby... Can make things a bit complicated. But even THEN... these things aren't different from ANY Windows platform these days. Windows Phone really is Windows... but a very carefully intedgrated and optimized Windows. Peter OSR @OSRDrivers
  Message 4 of 6  
10 Apr 18 23:00
R0b0t1
xxxxxx@gmail.com
Join Date: 24 Mar 2017
Posts To This List: 85
Mobile Drivers

Thanks Mr. Horan, Mr. GV. I remember the documentation touching on that. It blended together well enough it slipped my mind. I don't suppose there are mobile driver examples I missed? It is a pity the platform is winding down, I quite liked it. On Mon, Apr 9, 2018 at 1:41 PM, xxxxx@osr.com <xxxxx@lists.osr.com> wrote: > <quote> > how to proceed with Windows Phone driver development > </quote> > > Now... THERE's a topic I haven't had anyone ask me in, oh, two or three years at least... > > :-) > > <quote> > Are kernel facilities the same? <...excess quoted lines suppressed...>
  Message 5 of 6  
11 Apr 18 11:40
Peter Viscarola (OSR)
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List Moderator
Mobile Drivers

<quote> I don't suppose there are mobile driver examples I missed? </quote> Well... again... the drivers for Windows Mobile aren't particularly "special" in design or architecture. They're just Windows Universal Drivers. Which is what makes them cool. The only thing that might make them SORT OF different is the particular technologies they support. SO, for example, you probably don't have an accelerometer on your desktop system, but you almost certainly have one on your phone. So, an I2C or SPI connected accelerometer would be a "phone device." In general, there are more "cute" peripherals like this that are SPB-connected on phones... though I expect the use of SPBs to connect peripherals on laptops and desktops to increase... and there's nothing "special" about the fact that the devices are connected on a phone. Peter OSR @OSRDrivers
  Message 6 of 6  
11 Apr 18 16:55
R0b0t1
xxxxxx@gmail.com
Join Date: 24 Mar 2017
Posts To This List: 85
Mobile Drivers

On Wed, Apr 11, 2018 at 10:39 AM, xxxxx@osr.com <xxxxx@lists.osr.com> wrote: > <quote> > I don't suppose there are mobile driver examples I missed? > </quote> > > Well... again... the drivers for Windows Mobile aren't particularly "special" in design or architecture. They're just Windows Universal Drivers. Which is what makes them cool. > > The only thing that might make them SORT OF different is the particular technologies they support. SO, for example, you probably don't have an accelerometer on your desktop system, but you almost certainly have one on your phone. So, an I2C or SPI connected accelerometer would be a "phone device." > Right, I should have said something that made better reference to device classes that you might find more commonly on phones. I suppose I could look at some Windows IoT stuff. > In general, there are more "cute" peripherals like this that are SPB-connected on phones... though I expect the use of SPBs to connect peripherals on laptops and desktops to increase... and there's nothing "special" about the fact that the devices are connected on a phone. > Expecting this, but was also interested in any proprietary on-chip interconnects that may exist, though I suspect details on those will not be forthcoming. Most devices seem to be (directly) memory mapped now, anyway. Cheers, R0b0t1 > Peter > OSR > @OSRDrivers > > > > --- > NTDEV is sponsored by OSR > > Visit the list online at: <http://www.osronline.com/showlists.cfm?list=ntdev> <...excess quoted lines suppressed...>
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