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Definition of “CPU” Environment Variable Changed

The definition of the build environment variable CPU has changed since release of the Windows XP® DDK. In both the XP SP1 and Windows .NET (beta) DDK's the variable value CPU has change from "i386" to "x86". However, the platform specific sub-directory generated for objects and build products is still "i386". This means that if you are using CPU in your sources file to indicate the target platform in a path, you must now use an asterisk (*) instead. Use of the asterisk will correctly reference the "i386" directory when building on x86.

For example, if mylib.lib is built using a sources file that defines TARGETPATH, it will be built in the directory (TARGETPATH)\i386 when building on x86. To access this lib for another build, I must use the following line in my sources file: 

TARGETLIBS=(TARGETPATH)\*\mylib.lib

When building on x86, this is equivalent to:

TARGETLIBS=(TARGETPATH)\i386\mylib.lib

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If You Build It - Visual Studio and Build Revisited
Building Within Visual Studio (IDE)
New Build Definitions?
Definition of DDKBUILDENV Changed in Windows XP®

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